• All Classes are Subject to Enrollment
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  • June 1 – June 24 (4 weeks)
    Section A2; Session 1: Online
    Instructor: Smruthi Kannan
    Introduction to Childhood Studies 50:163:101 (3 credits)

    This course examines various ways that childhood has been discussed, researched and understood as a social phenomenon and social institution. Course materials are selected to illustrate how various notions of childhood and “the child” impact cultural understandings regarding the “nature” of children. Historical as well as contemporary research and perspectives are used to address such issues as changing definitions of childhood, changing age norms, the idea of children as social actors, race, gender and social class aspects of children’s experiences, children’s rights and child labor and work in a global context

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    June 1- June 24 (4 weeks)
    Section A3; Session 1: Online
    Instructor:  Halle Singh
    Gender and Education  50:163:384(3 credits)

  • This course explores the relationship between gender and education, focusing primarily on the context of K-12 schooling.  Through multi-disciplinary social science studies, films, and biographical narratives, students consider the ways in which gender is socially constructed within schools.  We explore the construction and contestation of gendered identities through multiple mechanisms including within-school social interactions, practices, policies, and structures, as well as through broader socio-cultural norms.  How do the media, family life, and government shape patterns of gender within schools?  Also, the course will explore briefly trends in gender and higher education as well as international trends in girls’ education.
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  • June 28 – July 22 (4 weeks)
    Section D3; Session 2: Online
    Instructor:  Ryan Bunch
    Children’s Literacies 50:163:362 (3 credits)

    This course considers the ways in which “literacy” has expanded beyond learning to read and write. The literate child must negotiate not only traditional textual and visual formats such as picture books, animated television programs and novels, but also websites, hand held devices, and film.   Students will learn both the historical contextualization of children’s literacy and be introduced to multi-modal and transmedia texts available to–and at times created by–children and young adults, including websites, iPhone Apps, fan fiction, graphic novels and books in order to gain a deep understanding of the multiple literacies of childhood.

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  • June 28 – July 22 (4 weeks)
    Section D2; Session 2: Online
    Instructor: Diana Garcia
    Global Childhoods 50:163:362 (3 credits)

  • This course considers the 20th and 21st centuries as eras of globalization in which traditional social and familial structures are breaking down. Within this context children’s experiences are infused by influences from across the globe. In this course we will examine the extent to which children are impacted on by global factors including cultural and religious diversity and hybridity, transnational families and interethnic relationships. Salient issues will include children’s identity in a globalized world, the maintenance or erosion of tradition, the impact of travel and the impact of globalization on children’s cultural worlds. The course will draw on international examples of globalization and the interrelationships between local and global factors in children’s worlds.
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    July 26 – August 18 (4 weeks)
    Section J2; Session 3: Online
    Instructor:  Jessica Schriver
    Introduction to Childhood Studies 50:163:101 (3 credits)

    This course examines various ways that childhood has been discussed, researched and understood as a social phenomenon and social institution. Course materials are selected to illustrate how various notions of childhood and “the child” impact cultural understandings regarding the “nature” of children. Historical as well as contemporary research and perspectives are used to address such issues as changing definitions of childhood, changing age norms, the idea of children as social actors, race, gender and social class aspects of children’s experiences, children’s rights and child labor and work in a global context.