• Term I: 5/30-6/22 (Four-Week Term)
    Sec. A1: Online
    Eva Lupold
    ST: Children and Disabilities 50:163:381
    This course draws from ongoing dialogues and debates in the interdisciplinary fields of disability studies and childhood studies in order to better understand how disabled children and disabled childhood(s) are discussed, researched, and understood. Students in this course will be introduced to medical and social models of disability, while exploring how childhood can be viewed as a historical, cultural, and social construction. The course will examine the way that children’s disabilities intersect with other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, race, and class. It will also consider children’s disabilities cross-culturally and globally.
  • Term I: 5/30-7/6 (Six-Week Term)
    Sec. B1: M-Th 8:45-10:35 am
    Clovis Bergere
    Global Childhoods 50:163:371
    This course considers the 20th and 21st centuries as eras of globalization in which traditional social and familial structures are breaking down. Within this context children’s experiences are infused by influences from across the globe. In this course we will examine the extent to which children are impacted on by global factors including cultural and religious diversity and hybridity, transnational families and interethnic relationships. Salient issues will include children’s identity in a globalized world, the maintenance or erosion of tradition, the impact of travel and the impact of globalization on children’s cultural worlds. The course will draw on international examples of globalization and the interrelationships between local and global factors in children’s worlds.
  • Term II: 6/26-7/20 (Four-Week Term)
    Sec. D6: Online
    Ellen Malven
    Gender and Education 50:163:384
    This course explores the relationship between gender and education, focusing primarily on the context of K-12 schooling. Through multi-disciplinary social science studies, films, and biographical narratives, students consider the ways in which gender is socially constructed within schools. We explore the construction and contestation of gendered identities through multiple mechanisms including within-school social interactions, practices, policies, and structures, as well as through broader socio-cultural norms. How do the media, family life, and government shape patterns of gender within schools? Also, the course will explore briefly trends in gender and higher education as well as international trends in girls’ education.
  • Term II: 7/10-8/16 (Six-Week Term)
    Sec. H6: M/T/R, 6:00-8:30 pm
    Deszeree Thomas
    Intro to Childhood Studies 50:163:101
    Accumulating scientific evidence indicates that many health disparities have their origins in childhood and adolescence. This practice-based course will utilize a socio-ecological approach to provide students with a solid understanding of biological, psychosocial, environmental, cultural, political and other determinants of child and adolescent health, enabling them to conceptualize health promotion programs to reduce related disparities. Students will be expected to apply analytic tools and theoretical models to real-world child and adolescent health issues through community-based, participatory research and practice.
  • Term III: 7/24-8/16 (Four-Week Term)
    Sec. J1: Online
    Katie Fredricks
    Intro to Childhood Studies 50:163:101
    Accumulating scientific evidence indicates that many health disparities have their origins in childhood and adolescence. This practice-based course will utilize a socio-ecological approach to provide students with a solid understanding of biological, psychosocial, environmental, cultural, political and other determinants of child and adolescent health, enabling them to conceptualize health promotion programs to reduce related disparities. Students will be expected to apply analytic tools and theoretical models to real-world child and adolescent health issues through community-based, participatory research and practice.